Supervillains and Philosophy: Sometimes, Evil is its Own Reward

Supervillains and Philosophy Sometimes Evil is its Own Reward The devil gets his due in the latest entry in the Pop Culture and Philosophy series Supervillains and Philosophy features an international cabal of philosophers and comics industry professionals consp

  • Title: Supervillains and Philosophy: Sometimes, Evil is its Own Reward
  • Author: Ben Dyer
  • ISBN: 9780812696691
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Paperback
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      Posted by:Ben Dyer
      Published :2019-08-07T05:23:53+00:00

    The devil gets his due in the latest entry in the Pop Culture and Philosophy series Supervillains and Philosophy features an international cabal of philosophers and comics industry professionals conspiring to reveal the dark details and deeper meanings lurking behind today s most popular comic book monsters Whether it s their moral justification for world dominationThe devil gets his due in the latest entry in the Pop Culture and Philosophy series Supervillains and Philosophy features an international cabal of philosophers and comics industry professionals conspiring to reveal the dark details and deeper meanings lurking behind today s most popular comic book monsters Whether it s their moral justification for world domination or the wavering boundaries they share with the modern anti hero, everyone s favorite villains generate as much attention as their heroic counterparts The 20 essays in this accessible book explore the nature of supervillainy, examine the boundaries of good and evil, offer helpful advice to prospective supervillains, and untangle diabolical puzzles of identity and consciousness All the legends are here, from Dr Doom and the Spectre to the Joker and the Watchmen, reconsidered through the lens of classic and modern philosophy.

    Comment 149

    • Sarah says:

      This anthology of essays on the implications of philosophy for comic book super villains is rather uneven. Some essays, like O’Neil’s and Baringer’s, make a serious, scholarly effort to examine particular philosophical issues of specific characters or plot arcs. The most fun are the contributions that are written in-universe, such as those by Foresman, and Arinder and Milton. Much of the rest is either painfully dull logic exercises or summaries of plot lines with little philosophical anal [...]

    • Dustin says:

      I enjoyed it. Much like the other books in the " and Philosophy" series it's a collection of essays on philosophy in relation to a particular subject. As you can imagine, the theme of this collection is supervillains. My biggest complaint is the same as most other anthologies: it's somewhat uneven. I also think it suffers a bit from not having a longer page count and the various authors not getting to go into more depth with their essays. Both minor nitpicks for an otherwise good collection. I w [...]

    • Candice says:

      This is easily the weakest installment of Blackwell's Popular Culture and Philosophy that I've read so far. It had quite a high portion of essays which had no point, reached muddled conclusions, or just plain didn't fit the supervillain theme. It was still a good enough read to merit three stars, but it's certainly not winning any recommendations from me.For more impressions of individual essays, you're better off checking out my progress updates.

    • Ryan Scicluna says:

      A very narrow window into the lives of super villains from the comic book world. This book discusses motives and the nature of evil together with many other interesting questions about why some people do evil or what makes a person a villain. I highly recommend this book to any comic book fan or a student of philosophy.

    • Rob Richards says:

      Very disappointing. Rather than delve into the implications of villainy and villainous behaviour or even discuss the nature of evil, the editor brought together a bunch of second rate hacks to write bad Lovecraftian fanfiction and and mock the reader. DO NOT WANT.

    • Robert Lloyd says:

      A deeper perspective on our favorite villains If you enjoy comic books, and like me feel they can convey meaningful concepts about life, this is an excellent book. This book discusses a variety of villains who have quite complex stories and motivations. Also discussed are various approaches to how we could define evil, and what truly makes a villain. This is a marvelous book!

    • Greg says:

      Far from my favorite in this series, but the Wanted and Venom essays were food for thought

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